Thank you for your support Adrian!

I would like to take a moment to thank Adrian for your graceful support. Without users like you we would not be able to continue our free services.

 

No more helpful 3rd party posts – Email Complaint and Google revenue

So Free MySQL received an email about 3 or so days ago, complaining that Free MySQL was copying & posting content illegally. I would like to state we never changed the content to assume Free MySQL originally wrote this content. I personally don’t have the time to update useful content constantly for our free user systems. Free MySQL has well over 50 thousand users and only generates under 100/month to maintain these services. While these posts were not original work, Free MySQL thought that proving this information in one spot would be helpful. We provided the souce for each post that was created so that the original work always was recognized.

!! (IMPORTANT – GOOGLE) !!
Google also decided (ironically 3 days after this email) to disable our Ad revenue which will put a huge burden on our services. If Free MySQL does not see these funds we can not exist! While Free MySQL understands Google’s decision & does agree with it it was not our intention to break their policy on original majority content. Our intentions were to only provide useful information to our users and minimal expense to or services (time is money). Free MySQL has decided to remove this content, in hopes to gain Google’s trust & ultimately our revenue stream so to provide you with our service.

Free MySQL might open the option for our active users to post their own useful content to our website with the ability to link back to their website. please comment here you’re ideas & thoughts.

Thanks for your time – FREE!!! MySQL

SQL injection attacks – understanding the basics

A SQL injection attack is procedure often used to attack database backed systems. This procedure is where a hacker injects parts of an SQL Query in a way that forces the database to run his statement, exploiting a security flaw in an application. This is mostly used in a harmful/malicious act, causing the database to export/dump, update, or even completely remove the contents of the database.

Example of a basic SQL string that can be exploited by a SQL injection attack.

 SELECT sqldata FROM sqltable WHERE UserEmail = ‘$email_address’;

Example of a basic SQL injection string:

 email@gmail.com’; UPDATE sqltable SET UserEmail = ‘hackers@gmail.com’ WHERE UserEmail = ‘bob@gmail.com’;

Which would be ran like this:

 SELECT sqldata FROM sqltable WHERE UserEmail = ‘email@gmail.com’; UPDATE sqltable SET UserEmail = ‘hackers@gmail.com’ WHERE UserEmail = ‘bob@gmail.com’;

As you can see the SQL injection attack is updating a users email address so to gain access to the account.